Wednesday, April 09, 2008

Evoluntionary Origins?

Evolution is the idea that nobody plus nothing equals everything.
-John MacArthur

11 comments:

joar andré said...

The two issues I've been challenged with the most at the university are the idea of the inspiration of the Bible and the creation story. Part of my class believes in a Christian evolution (which is a mystery to me) and the other part believes in a creation over a longer period of time. Here's a minor detail I find interesting. The Christian response to evolution would be that God created everything out of nothing. That's true, unless you want to be really picky. God formed man out of the dust of the ground...

Paul said...

but he made the dirt too...

barry said...

Creativity is strange. It becomes more powerful the less there is to work with. However, you might say nothing is less than dirt. Maybe God didn't think so.

I like the quote. It puts two fundamental arguments together succintly

Jonas said...

Everything = Nobody + Nothing???

Working backwards, I don't think many evolutionists would expect to arrive at nothing. Rather, they wouldn't care. Humans-->Complex Cells---> Primordial Soup---> Big Bang---> Collision---> Force ---> Energy...

Try telling a physicist (staunch atheist he may be) that Energy spontaneously appeared on the scene, and he won't take you very seriously.

I think most serious evolutionists would say that thinking about how energy arrived on the scene is fruitless because it is entirely unverifiable. Whatever whimsical solutions philosophers want to come up with will be entirely satisfactory (given it doesn't provide for a caring deity; that wouldn't jive with repeated elimination by mutation)... any individuals who propose spontaneous generation may handily be referred to Louis Pasteur.

Of course, I believe in the Genesis account, but this distillation seems a bit of an overstatement.

Jan Robert (Robby) Heiberg said...

John, that was a great comment.

Julianne said...

very fascinating. I'm afraid I'm in for some of those difficult issues come fall. I suppose taking "speciation" could be a positive thing in that it will definitely shed light on both sides, (creation and evolution) but many people get confused from taking the required class. I planning to read up on this and pray a lot. Facing professors and other students on these topics is really hard for me.

Paul said...

John, I would respond that unvarifiable does not mean fruitless. Instead, it points to the limits of science and the beginning of philosophy. Metaphysics takes over where physics leaves off, and on metaphysical grounds I find creation far more pursuasive than evolution.

Kristin said...

I apologize for my lack of profundity or intellectual spark, but I just wanted to say that this quote made me laugh.

Alex said...

As one who has been "married" to my calc. based physics class for the past year and have a professor who likes to delve into metaphysics I can say that, from the standpoint of physics there are many things we can't explain. Nuclear physicists can, however, using the model of the big bang, calculate back and 'understand' what was happening 10^-39 seconds into the existence of the universe... but from there all of the laws of physics no longer hold and all calculations produce zeros and infinities that can't be dealt with. Essentially, from the standpoint of physics, the big bang requires a god (or an 'omega point' or other entity outside of our known universe)to set it in motion. Moving to the young earth argument, the unbelievably low entropy of our universe has creates even bigger problems such that a famous physicist (Roger Penrose) has said that, in terms of entropy, it is much more probable that some quantum fluctuation occured "creating" this universe (including our 'memories' or prior events) five minutes ago than that the universe could be 13,000,000,000 years old.

Jonas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jonas said...

After a brilliant lecture on the intricacies of evolution and origin, a professor was approached by an elderly lady.

"Professor, do you know what carries the world?"

"No, would you enlighten me?" replied the professor with a slight smile.

"A Turtle" replied the old lady.

"Ah!" said the professor. "And what carries the turtle?"

"Another Turtle" she replied.

"And what carries that turtle?"

"Another Turtle" she replied.

He would have asked her again, but she anticipated his question, and grasped his sleeve. Looking him straight in the face she said.
"You know, it's turtles all the way down..."